Ford unveiled an ambitious plan in February 2023: a $3.5 billion factory to make batteries for its growing electric car lineup. According to CNN, that project has now been shelved.

According to CNN, the plant was originally scheduled to open in 2026. It would employ about 2,500 people and occupy 950 acres close to Marshall, Michigan.

The project has been put on hold.For the Marshall project, we are halting work and reducing building expenditures until we are certain that we can operate the plant in a way that will compete.

In an email, Ford spokesman T.R. Reid informed CNN that no decision has been made regarding whether or not the facility will be finished. 

Although CNN reports that Ford has not disclosed the precise factors, the ongoing labor dispute with the United Auto Workers (UAW) is a plausible contender.

which is worried that the unnegotiated switch to electric vehicles will lead to lower wages and fewer jobs.

Undoubtedly, UAW President Shawn Fain interprets the construction halt as a reaction to the strike.

"This is a shameful, barely-veiled threat by Ford to cut jobs," stated Fain in a message that was put on X, the former name of Twitter.

The Big Three have threatened to close plants that aren't even open yet, as if closing 65 plants in the previous 20 years wasn't enough.

All we're asking for is a fair shift to electric cars, but Ford is intensifying its downward spiral instead.

EV sales have been rising, and they now account for 10% of all new car sales globally.

Businesses that had previously ignored EVs, like Ford, are starting to pay more attention to these progressively more accessible vehicles.

consumer-friendly and ecologically conscious automobiles To save the environment, a mass switch to automobiles that emit less pollution is required.

It will be more difficult for humanity to adopt EVs widely if big businesses like Ford are unable to secure the manpower and infrastructure necessary to make it happen.

It will be more difficult for humanity to adopt EVs widely if big businesses like Ford are unable to secure the manpower and infrastructure necessary to make it happen.